Huapai Golf Club bar manager robbed on his one year anniversary

A bar manager had a “freaky anniversary” when he was robbed at gunpoint by three men exactly one year after he started working at an Auckland golf club.

Brett Bending, 51, was cashing up by himself at Huapai Golf Club, north of Auckland, around 9pm on January 11. Three men busted in with handguns and demanded money.

“I just looked at the piece of paper on the wall about what to do if there’s a robbery.

“It said give them the money, don’t argue, do whatever they say. I sort of did that.

“It wasn’t the best part of the day.”

Bending handed over the cash which was a “considerable amount” and probably over $1000. Then they tied him up with a 10m computer cord and left. Bending said they didn’t tie it very tight.

“I moved my arms and it fell off, then I rang police immediately.”

Today Bending felt “numb” to last night’s incident. He was waiting for the shock and fear to kick in.

“I don’t know when I’ll drop a glass and lose it. I’ll be cashing up and there’ll be a noise and it’ll all come floating back.

“I’ve never had anything like that before.”

Bending had been a bartender for 23 years but had worked at the Huapai Golf Club for one year exactly on January 11.

Bending thought the men were under 30 and one was the leader. He was the one who did most of the talking.

“One was calm and assertive. The other two followed what he said.”

The golf club has insurance and will be beefing up their security measures, Bending said. They were going to change things so no person is cashing up alone anymore.

Acting Detective Sergeant Jackson Shewry from Rodney Police said the offenders threatened the manager and took his wallet. They also took a sum of money, cash boxes and the golf club tip jar.

The employee was then tied up and had his face covered.

Shewry said the offenders had their faces covered with bandannas and wore black hooded sweatshirts.

Police have today carried out a scene examination at the property and a number of inquiries are under way.

NZ Herald

Amazon plans to create 100,000 full-time jobs over the next 18 months

Amazon.com announced it plans to create more than 100,000 full-time jobs over the next 18 months, a massive hiring spree that suggests the e-commerce company expects a run of breakneck growth for its retailing operations and its lucrative cloud computing division.

Amazon, whose chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post, says the hiring will include a broad range of positions, including engineers and software developers but also big teams to work in its growing network of fulfillment centers.

The announcement by Amazon comes as President-elect Donald Trump has directed a series of angry tweets at companies that have moved jobs overseas or are opening new plants abroad. Perhaps in response, many in corporate America have begun to trumpet their commitment to creating jobs in the United States. Last week, for example, when Stanley Black and Decker announced it had agreed to buy the Craftsman tool brand from Sears, it was careful to stress that the deal would mean the company was going to do more manufacturing stateside.

Amazon’s plans to significantly grow its workforce are a sharp contrast to what has been seen elsewhere in the retail industry in recent weeks. Macy’s announced last week it will slash some 10,000 jobs this year as it closes stores and tries to cut costs by thinning its ranks of middle managers. The Limited just laid off 4,000 people as it closed its entire fleet of brick-and-mortar stores.

And it continues a pattern seen during the holiday season. While traditional chains such as Kohl’s and Target added roughly the same number of temporary workers in 2016 as they did in 2015, Amazon significantly expanded its brigade of seasonal hires from 100,000 in 2015 to 120,000 in 2016.

Amazon’s U.S. workforce has swelled from 30,000 employees in 2011 to about 180,000 in 2016. The company said many of the new positions would be in Texas, California, Florida and New Jersey, where it is currently constructing new warehouses in which it will pack online orders.

Washington Post